#Minneapolis: Conflict in the Twin Cities 2016

The year 2016 was a tumultuous year for everyone. For anarchists living in the Twin Cities, it was a year marked with a number of successes as well as bitter defeats.

conflict16-cover

Originally published by Conflict MN

Click at image above to download, read, print and spread the Conflict in the Twin Cities 2016 zine (PDF file)

This zine has compiled all the posts (with some exceptions) from Conflict MN during the year of 2016. In lieu of any overarching narrative, everything here is presented as it is on the site without commentary. Readers are invited to draw their own conclusions, if any, from the contents of this zine.
Preface
The year 2016 was a tumultuous year for everyone. For anarchists living in the Twin Cities, it was a year marked with a number of successes as well as bitter defeats.
The year 2015 closed after several weeks of protests over the police murder of Jamar Clark, a black man from north Minneapolis. While the initial days were marked with sharp antagonism culminating in a riot in response to the attempted eviction of a encampment that had been set up the night after the shooting. Afterwards, counter-insurgent forces doubled their efforts, only strengthened when a handful of white supremacists shot at the camp and injured five. Anarchists and other potential rebels were confronted by protest security and often bad-jacketed (as cops, white supremacists, or more simply agitators). The camp was finally evicted by police with little resistance. With this, Minneapolis joined a growing list of cities that have been hit with unrest in response to police shootings since the Ferguson riots of 2014.
It is hopefully non-controversial to state that an anarchist or autonomous street presence has been practically nonexistent in recent years. The end of 2015 saw a few modest attempts; a small rally for imprisoned anarchists in Spain early November, a fifty-strong
march in solidarity with the northside protests later that month, and finally a New Year’s Eve noise demo that fetched nearly a dozen people.
Many obstacles appeared early on that continue to appear today. Notably, many people expressed hesitation to go to a demonstration that was not organized or endorsed by any identifiable organization. It remains difficult to reach out to various anarchist circles across the metropolitan area, even more so to convince them an action was worth going to over a party or dinner plans. Our understanding of the police’s response to different actions was only just beginning to come together.
In lieu of any overarching narrative, everything here is presented as it is on the Conflict MN site without commentary. Readers are invited to draw their own conclusions, if any, from the contents of this zine.
– an editor with Conflict MN

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Its time to revolt!
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