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Hong Kong: Reflecting on an insurrection – An interview with Au Loong-Yu

To celebrate the publication of his new book, Au Loong-Yu joins Roar Mag to talk about the origins, scope and legacy of last year’s Hong Kong rebellion.

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How the ‘Lion Rock Spirit’ crushed Hong Kong’s calls for strikes

‘Liberate Hong Kong, The Revolution of Our Times’ is not just any chant; it is an idea rooted in a decolonial politics.

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The Final Straw: We Need To Spread This Freely: JN On #HongKong Under National Security Law

This week, I speak with JN, an anarchist who works with the decolonial, leftist HongKonger platform, Lausan, talks about where the uprising against Chinese integration in Hong Kong stands, the National Security Law, tankie and rightwing narratives and international anti-authoritarian solidarity and resistance.

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Hong Kong: 11 articles on police abolition

Hong Kong. July 21. 2020. Today is the anniversary of the Yuen Long attacks. On July 21, 2019, a group of men in white shirts, wielding wooden canes and steel rods, laid violent siege to commuters on their way home from a protest. For 35 minutes, the police were nowhere to be found. The attacks revealed the collusion between the government, the police, and land owning triads benefitting from colonial land policies. Above all, it was a moment of collective trauma—a warning of the violence that was yet to come.

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Welcome to the Frontlines: Beyond Violence and Nonviolence

Over the past two weeks, the US has seen some of the largest, most militant protests and riots in decades. The now nationwide movement began in Minneapolis following the police murder of George Floyd. The anger that followed led to mass demonstrations, confrontations with the police, arson and looting, mourning and rebellion that spread across the country within a matter of hours. The Minneapolis Third Precinct station house, where the murderers had worked, was burned to the ground, and police cars were set aflame from New York to LA in the most widespread damage to the punitive edifices of the US state seen in this century, fueled by decades of anger at racist policing and the ceaseless stream of police murders of Black people. Now, even the reform-oriented electoral left is seriously discussing a softened version of police abolition on a national level, re-imagined as “defunding,” and the Minneapolis City Council has pledged to “disband” the city’s police department. Not long ago, such a demand would have been considered utopian.

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Hong Kong: Water, fire and the wind – The battle for #PolyU

The following report on the siege and battle of the Polytechnic University of Hong Kong, written by the “Cafardnaüm Collective”, describes the events of November 14-19, 2019 and is as impressive as it is poetic, testifying to the ingenuity and determination of the occupiers. In other words, it may do justice to the dimensions of the event. A German version appeared on Non Copy Riot, from which this analogous translation was made.

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