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January 6: First as Farce, Next Time as Tragedy? – What If We Knew We Would Face Another Coup?

What if we knew that we would face the same situation that occurred on January 6 again, but with Trump and his supporters better prepared for it? How would we prepare?

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How Farmers Defeated the Government of India – A Year of Protests Shows the Effectiveness of Horizontality and Direct Action

India. In the following report, Pranav Jeevan P [1] explores the conflict between the farmers and the far-right government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the character of the movement that the farmers initiated, and the means by which they triumphed.

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How (Not) to Abolish The Police – A Guide from the City of Minneapolis

Minneapolis. MN. There has been lot of talk about police abolition over the past year and a half. But very different proposals coincide under this language. The coming years could see the phasing out of police departments—and in their place, an array of other agencies, activists, psychiatrists, and neighborhood watch organizations enforcing the same social order under a different name.

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Break The Borders: For Solidarity, Mutual Aid, And Fire To The American Plantantion

Poster and zine by Crimethinc, Ill Will Editions and Its Going Down: Break The Borders: For Solidarity, Mutual Aid, And Fire To The American Plantantion.

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The Craziest Walk Ever – The View from in Front of the Burning Pentagon on September 11, 2001

Now that the United States has withdrawn from Afghanistan after a ruinous 20-year occupation, we can see the attacks of September 11, 2001 in a different light. Islamist jihadists were baiting the empire into a disastrous “war on terror” that they knew would polarize more people into their own camp, even as it inflicted unthinkable tragedies upon all sides—above all, upon those on the receiving end of imperialist violence. From the initial attacks to the US government response, the entire affair was calculated to channel conflicts resulting from capitalist colonialism into a religious war that would reduce the spectrum of possibility to a choice between rival militarisms.

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Afghanistan: The Taliban Victory in a Global Context – A Perspective from a Veteran of the US Occupation

The speed with which the Taliban have recaptured Afghanistan ahead of the United States pullout illustrates how fragile the hegemony of the US empire is: how much force it takes to maintain it and how quickly everything can change when that force is withdrawn. It offers a glimpse into a possible post-imperial future—though hardly a promising one. Why were the Taliban able to regain so much territory so quickly? What do the US withdrawal and its consequences tell us about the future and how we might prepare for it?

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No Gods, No Masters Degrees – A Memoir of Struggle from Outside and Inside the Institutions of Learning

Continuing CrimethInc’s back-to-school theme this week, we offer a memoir about how university students can engage in class mutiny, weaponizing their access to resources in order to contribute to broader struggles against capitalism. This narrative charts the trajectory of one rebel from the confrontational dropout politics of the anti-globalization era to an effort to infiltrate and undermine the institutions of power from within, ending with a rousing call for people of all professions and social positions to subvert their roles for the sake of collective liberation.

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Deschooling: Unlearning to Learn – From Education to Liberation

As students prepare to return to an increasingly dystopian learning environment, it’s a good time to revisit our assumptions about education itself. What is the purpose of our educational institutions? How deeply do the premises of those institutions shape the ways that we approach learning, even in our “free time”? How else might we go about developing and exploring our capacities?

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Genoa 2001: Memories from the Front Lines – Taking on the G8 at the Climax of a Movement

Genoa. Italy. Twenty years ago today, at the peak of a movement against capitalist globalization, hundreds of thousands of people gathered in Genoa, Italy to oppose the summit of the eight most powerful governments in the world—the G8. The demonstrations in Genoa represented the high-water mark of an era of global protest, in which both confrontational tactics and police repression reached their apex. In a new era of uprisings, we stand to learn a lot from studying previous cycles of resistance. The following narrative history recounts the mobilization in Genoa through a series of firsthand accounts from the front lines.

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Chile: The Hot Potato Changes Hands – But What Does Victory for the Left Mean for Autonomous Movements?

Chile. On the weekend of May 15-16, 2021, voters across Chile delegates to the convention that will compose a new constitution for the country. The right wing was soundly defeated in these elections, but no institutional left party gained a majority, either. The corporate media are heralding this as a victory for “independent” politics—but what will this mean for the autonomous movements that gave the left politicians momentum in the first place? In the following analysis, our correspondent in Chile explores the irreconcilable tension between the politics of representation and the politics of direct action.

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