Posted on Leave a comment

⁠The moral force of violence and the limits of reform

After George Floyd’s murder, the authorities’ moved fast to indict the killers. But protests and riots erupted nonetheless, because reform is not enough.

Continue reading ⁠The moral force of violence and the limits of reform
Posted on Leave a comment

No longer merely metaphor: Re-reading The Plague by Albert Camus

Albert Camus’ novel The Plague offers a portrait of a town under quarantine, ravaged by an epidemic. It tells us of life arbitrarily constrained and unjustly shortened, of human beings isolated by law and by disease, of panics and shortages, of despair and heroic sacrifice. It presents a grim picture of human life, but an affirming picture of human beings.  It ends with a clear moral, that “what we learn in time of pestilence” is that “there is more to admire in humanity than to despise.” [1]

Continue reading No longer merely metaphor: Re-reading The Plague by Albert Camus
Posted on 1 Comment

An #Anarchism of the Working-Class: A Review of Whither Anarchism?

I appreciate Kristian Williams’ pamphlet, both the thought put into it and the challenge it represents. I learned a lot from its history, and in particular gained insight into the behavior of anarchists I meet today. Williams traces some practices of contemporary US anarchism back to pacifism, looking at how contemporary anarchists unthinkingly accept much of that philosophy. In my view, that influence led to the movement prioritizing providing comfort to its participants, rather than organizing to change the circumstances that led to the discomfort they feel with society in the first place.  This emphasis accepts the inevitability of capitalism and is therefore a strategy to live within its parameters. But I don’t think capitalism will allow us these spaces.  Instead, it has to be overthrown and not allowed to come back.

Continue reading An #Anarchism of the Working-Class: A Review of Whither Anarchism?