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The Fools and the Wise – By Jacques Ranciere

Jacques Ranciere reflects on the end of the Trump presidency and asks how this decline into unreason reconstructed what democracy means.

“Rather than the comfort of indignation or derision, the events that marked the end of Donald Trump’s presidency should prompt us to take a somewhat closer look at the forms of thought we call rational and the forms of community we call democratic.”

Jacques Ranciere
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How to Blow Up a Pipeline: A letter from the Editor

“What is remarkable about Andreas’s writing, to me, is that in reading this book, it’s immediately clear that destruction, sabotage, and occupation are acts of love.”

Jessie Kindig, editor
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France: This is What Energy Transition Looks Like – L’Amassada Eviction One Year Later

France. Reflections on the struggle against the need for energy and its production under capital, reflections on the illusions of “renewable or green energy sources”, reflections on the ZAD as a model of resistance-creation, … remembering the Amassada ZAD…

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The pervasiveness of carelessness

As carelessness takes hold in so many domains of life, and as community ties are profoundly weakened, the family is often encouraged to step in as society’s preferred infrastructure of care.

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A Kick in the Belly: a letter from the Editor

“From this meticulously researched and beautifully written book emerges not only an account of the experiences of enslaved women, but of their stubborn insubordination, their tireless resistance and the crucial role they played in rebellions, small and large.”

Rosie Warren, Verso editor, on the publication of A Kick in the Belly.
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Nine Mile Ride: Why Police Reform Always Results in More Police Violence, Not Less

Policing is many things and all of them are about mobility. Police arrest mobility through traffic stops and checkpoints, interrupt mobility with borders and curfews, monitor mobility by helicopter or camera, force mobility by firing tear gas or sending in police dogs.

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Police Violence and the Criminalization of the Poor in #Kenya

Police brutality is endemic in modern Kenya, and a legacy of British colonial rule, write community organisers Gacheke Gachihi and Esther Waigumo Njoki. 

Image above by Mutua MSJC

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Policing Bolsonaro’s Brazil

‘The question of public security, policing and racism can no longer be separated from the overall question of Brazilian democracy itself – if it ever could.’ Alex Hochuli reports on the lethal police tactics flourishing under the Bolsonaro regime.

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66 Days – The USA between #lockdown and riots

It took just 66 days to get from the first shelter-in-place order to the first riot. Joshua Clover writes on the current protests and riots that have sprung up across the United States in the wake of the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, and their context at a time of economic and social crisis.

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